Category Archives: Immigrants

Fact Sheet: Immigrant-Origin Adult without Postsecondary Credentials, Migration Policy Institute

The following information about Immigrant-Origin Adults without Postsecondary Credentials: A Virginia-State Profile – (MPI_USandStateProfiles_AdultsPSCredentials-Virginia)  includes excerpts from a memo from the new Migration Policy Institute (Michelle Mittelstadt, Director of Communications and Public Affairs):

MPI-Virginia

To see full Virginia Excell spreadsheet, click on this document: MPI_USandStateProfiles_AdultsPSCredentials

New Migration Policy Institute (MPI) profiles of adults, immigrant-origin and otherwise, without postsecondary credentials for the United States, all 50 states, and the District of Columbia reflect differing realities as policymakers consider investments in improving the skills of workers.

Immigrant-origin adults made up 30 percent of all U.S. adults without postsecondary credentials in 2017. Their concentrations, however, were far higher in some states: 58 percent of all adults in California, 43 percent in Nevada and Massachusetts, and 40 percent in Texas and Connecticut.

In all but two states—New Hampshire and Maine—the overall number of immigrant-origin adults has grown faster than the number of adults with only U.S.-born parents since 2000

The MPI fact sheet, Immigrant-Origin Adults without Postsecondary Credentials: A 50-State Profile, and accompanying data snapshots offer a profile of the 100 million U.S. adults without postsecondary credentials, including the 30 million of immigrant origin, focusing on key characteristics that should be taken into account by public and private credentialing initiatives.

“For state and national economies to fully benefit from the untapped potential of immigrant-origin workers, credentialing initiatives will need to be capable of helping participants overcome a range of labor-market challenges, including by building English proficiency and filling gaps in prior education, as well as honing skills in demand in key sectors,” write researchers Jeanne Batalova and Michael Fix.

The state-level data follows the recent release of a national-level report, Credentials for the Future: Mapping the Potential for Immigrant-Origin Adults in the United States, part of a research project funded through a grant from the Lumina Foundation.

You can access the fact sheet here: www.migrationpolicy.org/research/immigrant-origin-adults-postsecondary-credentials-50-states.

And the state-level data snapshots here: www.migrationpolicy.org/sites/default/files/datahub/MPI_USandStateProfiles_AdultsPSCredentials.xlsx

Thank you VAACE (Virginia Association for Adult Continuing Eduction) and Jacqueline Chavez, Catholic Charities Diocese of Arlington for forwarding this information

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Strategic Leverage: Use of State and Local Laws to Enforce Labor Standards in Immigrant-Dense Occupations

Image of the report from the Migration Policy Institute entitled "Strategic Leverage: Use of State and Local Laws to Enforace Labor Standards in Immigrant-dense Occupations"This March, 2018 report by Andrew Elmore and Muzaffar Chishti from the Migration Policy Institute discusses the widespread practice of employer workplace violations in immigrant-dense industries.

“Immigrants, who account for 17 percent of the U.S. labor force, are twice as likely as native-born workers to be employed in an industry where violations of core labor standards are widespread. These wage-and-hour and safety-and-health law violations can often be traced back to the changing nature of the relationship between low-wage workers and the companies that employ them. For example, the practice of misclassifying workers as “independent contractors” rather than employees—and thus removing them from the protection of many workplace laws and enabling companies to sidestep payroll taxes, unemployment insurance contributions, and workers’ compensation requirements—is common in low-wage industries from construction to transportation.”

Click on this link to access the Migration Policy Institute’s report: Strategic Leverage

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