Workplace Readiness: Can It Lead to Better Employment and Earnings for Low-Income Adults?

This brief discusses 19 interventions identified by the Employment Strategies for Low-Income Adults Evidence Review (ESER) that featured workreadiness services as their primary employment or training strategy.2 This brief describes work-readiness interventions and their impact on employment and earnings. It also profiles six promising interventions and their impacts in more detail.This brief,by Jacob Hartog, Sarah Wissel, Annalisa Mastri, and Kelley Borradaile discusses 19 interventions identified by the Employment Strategies for Low-Income
Adults Evidence Review (ESER) that featured workreadiness services as their primary employment or
training strategy.2 This brief describes work-readiness
interventions and their impact on employment and
earnings. It also profiles six promising interventions
and their impacts in more detail.

To read this 2016 brief, click on this link:  https://www.acf.hhs.gov/sites/default/files/opre/eser_ib_workreadiness_111116_b508.pdf

The Employment Strategies for Low-Income Adults Evidence Review (ESER) is a systematic review of the literature on the impacts of employment and training programs and policies for low-income people. Sponsored by the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation (OPRE) in the Administration for Children and Families, ESER provides practitioners, policymakers, researchers, and the public with a transparent, systematic assessment of the quality of research evidence supporting approaches to improve the employment-related outcomes of low-income adults.

Green line that separates post

“More Unprepared Than We Thought: Adult educational attainment,” an SREB Fact Sheet

“Low-skilled workers are being left behind as technology shifts the workforce toward the middle-skills level. Educators and policymakers will need to reach these adults with education and training to fill plentiful, well-paying middle-skill jobs in their states. This [2018] fact sheet summarizes trends and state policy concerns.” – SREB (Southern Regional Education Board), November 2018

2017 KIDS COUNT Data Book: State Trends in Child Well-Being By the Annie E. Casey Foundation’s KIDS COUNT Project

Image of the cover of the 2017 Kids Count Data Book“The 2017 KIDS COUNT Data Book urges policymakers not to back away from targeted investments that help U.S. children become healthier, more likely to complete high school and better positioned to contribute to the nation’s economy as adults. The Data Book also shows the child poverty rate in 2015 continued to drop, landing at 21%. In addition, children experienced gains in reading proficiency and a significant increase in the number of kids with health insurance. However, the data indicate that unacceptable levels of children living in poverty and in high-poverty neighborhoods persist.”

To download the PDF document of the data book, click on this link to 2017 Kids Count Data Book: https://www.aecf.org/resources/2017-kids-count-data-book/

Green line that separates post

 

 

Incarceration to Reentry: Education & Training Pathways in Ohio

CLASP (Policy Solutions That Work for Low-Income People) LogoThis brief (May 21, 2018), by Wayne Taliaferro and Duy Pham, explains how Ohio is aligning education and training opportunities for people who are currently or formerly incarcerated. This is the third entry in our series “Reconnecting Justice in the States,” which explores coordinated justice, education, and workforce policy and practice at the state level. It is part of CLASP’s continued commitment to leverage criminal justice reform to expand economic opportunity and help achieve racial equity.

About CLASP: The Center for Law and Social Policy (CLASP) is a national, nonpartisan, nonprofit organization advancing policy solutions for low-income people.

Green line that separates post

 

Critiquing Adult Participation in Education (CAPE)

Logo of ValueUSA.orgThe project described in the 3 links below is in regard to recruitment and retention issues that involved focus groups and interviews with 125 adults in 5 states who are eligible to participate in adult education but do not participate, trying to understand the barriers (of all types), motivations, and tech use of these non-participants.

VALUEUSA is a national non-profit organization committed to adult learner involvement and leadership. In 2017 and 2018 the CAPE (Critiquing Adult Participation in Education) research team surveyed the motivations of and conducted group interviews with 135 adults. Adults identified and prioritized deterrents, root causes, and solutions with researchers. Three reports with findings from these data inform adult educators and stakeholders and provide recommendations for outreach and retention.

CAPE Report 1 Deterrents and Solutions

CAPE Report 2 Motivation around Adult Education

CAPE Report 3 Technology Use

Green line that separates post

Adult Education Attainment and Assessment Scores: A Cross-National Comparison

Cover image of Stats in Brief, an NCES 2018 publication featuring Adult Education Attainment and Assessment Scores: A Cross-National Comparison.

This report on Adult Education Attainment and Assessment Scores: A Cross-National Comparison from the U.S. Department of Education (see link below) builds upon the

findings in the earlier National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) report (Goodman et al. 2013) to provide
additional cross-national comparisons of adult literacy and numeracy proficiencies by education attainment. Specifically, the brief highlights differences between
several countries in the average literacy and numeracy scores for adults at different levels of education attainment. The brief further compares gaps in literacy and numeracy scores between adults of higher
and lower education attainment across participating countries.
The results from the earlier NCES reports indicated that adults in the United States performed lower than or not measurably different from the PIAAC international
average in literacy and in numeracy (Goodman et al. 2013, Rampey et al.)
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION STATS IN BRIEF, SEPTEMBER 2017, NCES 2018–007
Green line that separates post

2018 Funding for WIOA programs

FY 2018 omnibus released, increases funding for key workforce, education programs [in the U.S.], March  22,  2018,  by Kermit Kaqleba, Katie Spiker, and Katie Brown, National Skills Coalition.

Congressional leaders last night released final text for an omnibus spending package (click on this link to appropriations.house.gov) that is expected to finalize Fiscal Year (FY) 2018 appropriations for most federal programs. The $1.3 trillion omnibus reflects the increased spending levels for both defense and non-defense programs agreed to as part of recent legislation lifting the budget “caps” for federal discretionary spending, and includes some critical boosts in funding for key education and workforce development programs…

Importantly, the omnibus rejects many of the proposed cuts to workforce and education programs that were included in President Trump’s FY 2018 budget request, and sends a clear signal about the bipartisan support for investments in skills as the economy grows.

  Click here to read the rest of the article.

Green line that separates post